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October 19, 2017


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Haujobb
Vertical Theory (Metropolis Records)

By: Vinnie Apicella

The astral sounds pulsate through your listening zone; the compelling, free flowing follow up to the acclaimed "Polarity" is an instantaneous burst of electro-luminescence that floats you high above the material world and into an hour long spiritual void before crashing down in a storm of industrial dance beats and vivid EBM flash. "Vertical Theory" finds the dynamic duo of Dejan Samardzic and Daniel Meyer in a loose mood, piloting a turbulent journey to another level above the settling dust of the atypical to a transcendental peak of techno music amalgamation. Now ten year veterans of the electronic scene, Haujobb's music is about vision as much as anything else and to that end, the songs follow pathways from past to present to beyond, marking personally strewn territory as with matters of perseverance, "Faith In Chaos," prescience, "Platform," romance, "Slide," "Metric," "Concrete," fear, "A Terrifying Truth," and foresight, "Claim The Planet." As is their trade, they defy complacency to instead mix rough samples of intrusive noise effects with ambient eroticism for a coarser more adventurous creation that's as stimulating as it is dilating. Compare or contrast the flawless beauty of "S.adow" with its layers of aural textures with the quirky mechanics of "Renegades Of Noize" or the static eccentricity of a song like "The Noize Institute" with the swarming windswept effects of "Claim The Planet," or the closing, "Penetration," destined to be a future classic once the rest of society catches up! "Polarity" and now "Vertical Theory," side by side, are cutting edge to the core, in an age of synth-driven safe harbors of soft-wave and drained energy. "Vertical" is to "Polarity" what "Polarity" was to predecessors like "Second Path" (and to a lesser extent, "Ninety-Nine") in that it's an antsy, edgy, artsy and temperamental tributary to the wonder of modern tech and mixology where no emotional fiber's left untreated, no key unpressed, no thought undiscovered and no one particular style, in this widening world of electronically swelled sound, is left to walk alone.
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